Introducing the NESLI International Advisory Board

The NESLI International Advisory Board has been announced, with education experts from all over the globe making up the group of ten. The board will meet regularly and focus on expanding NESLI's global influence, developing world class leadership and wellbeing programs and ensuring that schools in low socio-economic areas have access to these professional development opportunities.

NESLI is presenting at the National Education Summit

NESLI is excited to be hosting a two-day leadership development conference as part of the National Education Summit in August.

QELI and NESLI partner to boost professional development opportunities for educators across Australia.

Qeensland Education Leadership Institute (QELi) and the National Excellence in School Leadership Initiative (NESLI) are delighted to announce a new partnership to further strengthen educational leadership collaboration by providing greater access to professional development opportunities for educators and school leaders in Queensland and across Australia.

NESLI April Newsletter

The latest NESLI newsletter is here! We look at a new report that has been released into the Staff Wellbeing Toolkit and it's efficacy, announce a new partnership, preview a forthcoming event and more.

Teacher Wellbeing Course Delivers 98% Success Rate

NESLI’s Staff Wellbeing Toolkit is having a significant, positive impact on school staff around Australia, according to a new report measuring the efficacy of the support program.

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EQ VS IQ: CLASH OF THE TITANS​​

Are EQ and IQ destined to be at war? Paul Drewitt investigates.

On an average Google search we can find literally hundreds of articles and quotes highlighting the importance of EQ over IQ and leadership versus management.

The substance of such articles is always about whether EQ or IQ is more important. A series of well set out arguments are then highlighted in order to persuade the reader of the importance of EQ over IQ. 

I have always read such articles with much interest. Most highlight the point that EQ is more important than IQ and that your intelligence quotient is merely an indication of your brain’s overall fitness and efficiency.

We often become intrigued by the process of eliminating contributing factors and concentrate on prioritising processes to distinguish the ‘one area’ that is most important. We then focus on that one area at the expense of other skills that are part of the larger picture but equally important.

Let’s examine various examples that argue the point of complementation; that no single virtue or skill will necessarily lead to having more, being better at something or attaining more success, and that in most cases, we need to concentrate on skills integration to acquire excellence.

IQ + EQ

EQ is the ability to handle conflict, manage stress, develop self-awareness and work with people more effectively. You can see why this skill is highly sought after in the workplace and in our personal lives. Most people get this; if you demonstrate high EQ you can get along better with your colleagues, negotiate that million dollar deal or be promoted into a leadership position. However, the two Qs (IQ and EQ) are always linked, just as they are always held in comparison. They are linked for one main reason – they complement each other. 

When dealing with conflict in the workplace we need both Qs; if you are mediating a dispute you not only need a soft tone and disposition and the ability to read body language, but also a sharp mind to focus and demonstrate conceptual thinking. To feel the emotion of the situation and empathise also requires split decision thinking of when to respond and how to articulate in the correct way. To increase self-awareness and regulate our emotions to bounce back from failure requires high EQ, but also goal setting which got us started in the first place requires IQ through high levels of concentration and analytical thinking to refine our long term goals to medium term targets, and then to short term actions.

Like tall and short, EQ and IQ complement each other.

Leadership and Management

I often hear that leadership and management are not the same thing. Whilst I am in agreeance I also believe they complement each other and the focus should not be that one skillset is more important than the other. I have organised numerous school camps over the years and its true, the ability to inspire and motivate others, instilling meaning and purpose is the key to human motivation. This will then rub off on the children who feel the energy of the staff which in turn creates an atmosphere of fulfilment and enjoyment; there are certain jobs to be delegated and staff need to be intrinsically motivated to fulfil their obligations, as the leader cannot always be watching. 

However, there is also the administration side; permission forms, transport requirements and adhering to government policies and insurance matters. This must be of equal focus for accountability reasons but requires sound management skills. One skill set is no more important than the other and the leader must know how to do both. We all want to be the leader as it’s more glamorous, however a good leader must also be prepared to be a good manager.

Like day and night, leadership and management complement each other.

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